ecoexist store

2008
Sep 25

My wife, of course, likes to take baths. My son is afraid of the shower so he takes baths. I try to conserve water wherever I can and even take a 5 Gallon Bucket into the shower with me to collect the water when it’s heating up, and while I’m lathering up (5th paragraph down in the post). In a way I am a bit hypocritical in the sense that I have a pool, and pools aren’t eco-friendly or promote water conservation. I’ve been trying to think of ways to offset the extra consumption of water due to the pool – which leads me back to the bath water.


Our entire yard was cemented over a long time ago. It’s both a blessing and a curse in that it’s nice to not have to mow a lawn or do extra yard work and we save a lot of water by not having grass or other plant life, but it retains heat in a horrible way and on extremely hot days it may not cool down until 2am. It’s essentially a “hose down” yard but if it gets hosed down a few times a week then we aren’t saving any water over a grassed yard. We have two large dogs, so it needs to be hosed down often. I have been looking for a way to clean the bath water well enough to be able to use it to hose down the yard – thus re-purposing a large amount of used water.


I bought a 5.5GPM pump a while back from a used electronics store and I have lots of marine batteries to hook it up to. I also have three 55 gallon barrels which I can pump the water into. I wanted to build something to filter the water before it made it into the barrel, because it’s easier at that point that to filter it while it’s being siphoned out for use. Here’s what I came up with – which was inspired by an episode of Renovation Nation where a homeowner built something similar to filter rainwater:



  • 5 gallon bucket – can be bought at a hardware store for under $5, but most people already have one laying around

  • a 1 1/2″ pipe connector – male and female – for the drain hole. About $4 from the hardware store

  • two 2″ rubber gaskets for the pipe connectors, to seal around the hole. About $2.50 for a two pack (check in the faucet repair area in the plumbing section)

  • bag of sand – it was harder to find than I thought. About $4.50. This will do the core of the filtration

  • bag of pea gravel – about $3.50. This is used to keep the outlet from getting clogged up and to level out the bottom of the inside of the filter

  • Koi pond filter – also found at the hardware store in the outdoor garden center by the pond equipment. It was the most expensive piece @ $10. This is used to keep the sand in the filter, and also does some large particle filtering – hair and whatnot

  • Optional – a pack of terry cloths, about $2.50. I used them mainly for additional protection from the sand coming out and also to prevent the Koi pond filters from getting clogged up with sand.



Here are the step-by-step pictures of the project as I constructed the filter. You’ll notice that I had already cut the hole and put the pipe fitting in the bucket at this point. Also, before the pipe fitting is installed you’ll need to drill a few holes in the top pipe fitting (the piece that is in the bucket when assembled, not sticking out of the bottom) for complete drainage.



The parts list




Wash the pea gravel to get all the dirt off and fill the bottom of the bucket with enough pea gravel to make it level with the top of the pipe connector (the one that you drilled holes into before assembling)




I put a terry cloth rag on top of the gravel, in an attempt to make cleanup easier later




The Koi pond filter comes in two pieces, the denser one goes in at this point (it’s like a scrubber pad). These should have been cut to fit the bucket, but I was impatient and wanted to try it out




I put another terry cloth on top of that – this is important to help keep the sand out of the filter as much as possible




Put about 4″ of sand on top and level it out




Then another terry cloth, if you want to




Then the other half of the Koi pond filter




Then I threw on another terry cloth on top of all that. Now it’s time for the test. It’s best if you let clean water run through it for a few minutes to clean out all the dirt that needs to be washed out of the filter initially. It’s like a carbon filter for your refrigerator that also needs to have water run through it before it can be used. In hindsight I should have washed the pebbles before putting them in the filter, but it’s a lesson learned. Here’s my initial test run. The pipe fitting fits perfectly into the opening on the barrel it’s sitting on in the picture:




I suppose a disclaimer is in order. This filter is for NON-potable water only! Do not drink it.